What works best for appetite suppressant?

What are appetite suppressants and how do they work?

Weight-loss medications such as appetite suppressants are a form of appetite suppressant (diet pill). They have an effect on the brain's desire to consume. Diet pills might help you feel fuller sooner with less food by controlling hunger cravings. As a result, you consume less calories and shed pounds.


What is the efficacy of appetite suppressants?

In a 12-month period, persons who combine prescription appetite suppressants with healthy lifestyle modifications (a nutritious diet and exercise) lose 3% to 9% of their initial weight.


What types of appetite suppressants are there?

Appetite suppressants are available in both prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) forms. Orlistat (Alli®), a weight-loss medicine, operates by preventing fat absorption (it is not an appetite suppressor). Before taking over-the-counter diet medicines, consult your doctor. Some over-the-counter appetite suppressants have the potential to interfere with prescriptions or create health issues.


These prescription appetite suppressants have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

  • Tenuate dospan® (diethylpropion).

  • Saxenda® is a brand name for the drug liraglutide.

  • Contrave® is a combination of naltrexone and bupropion.

  • Phendimetrazine (Prelu-2®) is a phendimetrazine derivative.

  • Phentermine (Pro-Fast®) is a kind of phentermine.

  • Qsymia® is a combination of phentermine and topiramate.